The old Rules of Simulation no Longer Apply!

“When you use manikins in simulation you miss crucial elements of communication, empathy, and diversity.

“Our students know how to work with technology, they don’t know how to communicate with real people and they need practice.

I came from the ER into the simulation lab. After being told I was responsible for setting up the curriculum and a quick Google search informed just how much my job was going to entail. I was the person in the early 00’s getting manikins out of the box and programming my scenarios.

I was in the middle of a code blue scenario and the students were performing CPR on that manikin. I called the code overhead and I watched my student smack her hands down on the chest of the manikin and say “that’s it, your dead I’m done.” I watch in horror from the control room thinking that is someone’s husband, dad, that is a federal offense hitting a corpse. It occurred to me that they are not equating these manikins with human life.

I have then spent my time working to bring simulation to life by incorporating crucial objectives like communication, empathy, and diversity.

 

Amy Cowperthwait

Subject Matter Expert

Standardized Patient Methodology

Best Practice in Nursing Simulation

Teaching Affective Domain in Simulation

Past Presentation

TOPICS

BEST PRACTICES FOR STARTING AN AFFORDABLE STANDARDIZED PATIENT PROGRAM

It is easier than you think…  

Research on standardized patient (SP) simulation shows that there is an improved benefit to learning outcomes,  and  learners prefer this methodology over manikin based learning. Because SP simulation provides the optimal psychological fidelity, this methodology also provides the most psychological safety for the learners. There is significant momentum to integrate SP methodology across health professions education. Many simulationists report they are not satisfied with the status quo of mankin bases simulation and have begun building an SP program but lack the necessary resources to scale the program to support the teaching and learning needs of their students. By sharing research and evaluating best practice strategies, Amy will draw on her experiences in building an SP program from the ground up in the midst of the recession of 2008. 

Stimulating change when you aren’t in the position of authority

Simulation education is recognized as innovative, collaborative, and cutting edge. With the rapid adoption of simulation education in both academic and clinical environments early in the 21st Century, many institutions were remiss on establishing the hierarchy and resources needed to support a robust program. By our very nature, simulationists embrace change, adapt easily to emerging research, and integrate the resulting best practices. The challenge is how to provide the necessary leadership to create a thriving program without the title or budget to do so. Amy will draw on insight from the past, analyze the current trends in simulation education, and challenge the audience to explore the possibilities into the future. 

TEACHING DIVERSITY, EQUITY, AND INCLUSION WHEN YOU DO NOT FIT THE DEMOGRAPHIC

Answering the call for change

Diversity, equity, and inclusion have been a topic of discussion in both academia and clinical practice since the 2002 National Academies and Institute of Medicine report on health disparity. The report documented significant differences in the delivery of care by race and called for sweeping reform. The challenge for educators is identifying the best way to teach aspiring healthcare providers to interact with diverse patients who have been marginalized in the past, acknowledge and validate their patient’s experiences, and recognize how the patient’s past experiences impact their interaction with providers today.  As a middle class, caucasion female Amy was torn. She knew her learners needed to be exposed to diverse patients and begin to understand the impact of culture on health in a safe learning environment. She will share how she was able to overcome the limitations with the LEARN Framework and let the ‘patient’ speak from their own mental model to reinforce the learning objectives.  

Why is it different?

The convenience of hand held electronics and international database searches at your fingertips provides significant global benefits. However, the unanticipated repercussions are being felt by Next Gen nurses entering the workforce.  As a whole, many Next-gen’s are choosing a career in healthcare because they want their professional careers to make a positive impact on the world. However, research shows that they are much more comfortable interacting with technology than close relationships and human connection. This shift causes them to feel inadequate as they enter the workforce. Next-gen’s are faced with a whole new set of challenges. Not only do they need to develop confidence with their clinical judgment and psychomotor skills, they are ill prepared to provide the level of caring and compassion needed to be present with their patients in their times of greatest need. For this reason, the pool of Next-gen providers are leaving the profession at alarming rates citing compassion fatigue, burnout, mental health concerns and lack of preparation as one of the primary reasons for leaving the profession. In response, the healthcare industry is working hard to identify new strategies to retain its workforce. New educational strategies with standardized patients can simultaneously prepare the Next-gen workforce for therapeutic interventions, patient-centered communication, critical thinking, skills mastery, and patient advocacy. Amy will share how a few modifications to your institution’s  simulation education strategy will meet the teaching and learning needs for all generations of learners, equipping them with the knowledge, skills, and attitudes they desperately need to confidently provide compassionate, connected bedside care.

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Avtrach, a high-fidelity, wearable tracheostomy simulator, is designed to replicate an anterior thorax so tracheostomy care and suctioning can be authentically replicated in simulation. Through a Bluetooth connection between Avtrach and the Avkin app, an assortment of lung sounds can be changed at any time by the educator from the control room. These lungs allow for the Avtrach to be connected to a ventilator and the patient to be in line with suctioning.

Wearable Tracheostomy Simulator

Avwound, a high-fidelity, wearable wound care simulator, is the most significant technological advancement for wound care in the industry. Learners can assess, measure, document, and provide care for all four stages of pressure wounds in addition to an assortment of surgical wounds providing educators with maximum flexibility for wound care education.

Wearable Wound Care Simulator

Meant to replace the need for including bulky ineffective earpieces in simulation, Avband, is a smartwatch look-a-like for inconspicuous 3-way communication between the control room, patient, and Avkin simulators. An alert button on the side of the product allows the live patient to send a panic notification to the control room if they feel psychologically and/or physically unsafe at any time during the simulation.

Simulated Participant Cueing Device

With the world’s only fully-automated, wearable birthing simulator, Avbirth, you can now include learning objectives such as closed-looped communication with an interprofessional team and therapeutic communication with the patient and their significant other through all phases of labor and delivery. Avbirth pairs with the Avkin App, allowing a multitude of simulations to be performed, including additional challenges for the development of critical thinking, such as shoulder dystocia or postpartum hemorrhage.

Simulated Birthing Device

Avcath, a high-fidelity, wearable urinary catheterization simulator, seamlessly replicates the human urinary system. The interchangeable male (circumcised or uncircumcised) and female genitalia allows learners to practice various types of urinary catheterization while also practicing essential communication skills. Our genitalia is made with high-quality silicone, allowing learners to use betadine and lubrication right out of their kits.

Wearable Urinary Catheterization Simulator

Avline, a wearable central line simulator, delivers a high-fidelity patient experience for a multitude of central venous care (CVC) simulations. This innovative simulator has two options for central venous treatment and care, a right subclavian triple lumen or a left subclavian implanted port; each option is removable, allowing the educator flexibility with learning outcomes.

Wearable Central Line Simulator

Avstick, a wearable IV simulator worn as a left-arm sleeve, allows learners to practice high-fidelity IV insertion during simulation. The wearable simulator cues the live patient wearing the sleeve through haptic vibration when the needle first pierces the smart skin. Multiple layers of woven plastic have been integrated into premium silicone to protect the wearer from any harm during the simulation.

Wearable IV Simulator

Avtone, the world’s only wearable auscultation simulator, offers a compact and lightweight design, comfortable for the live patient to wear. An anatomically correct chest piece allows novice and advanced students to identify proper landmarks just as they would in the clinical setting. Volume controls allow learners and educators to pinpoint the finer details of the actual patient recorded sounds contained within the Avtone.

Wearable Auscultation Simulator

Avthor, a wearable chest tube care simulator, replicates the intrathoracic pressures needed to realistically teach the assessment and care of a patient with a chest tube. When pairing the Avthor with a live patient, the simulation can include repositioning, transferring, and/or ambulating a patient with a chest tube.

Wearable Chest Tube Care Simulator

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THANK YOU FOR YOUR INTEREST IN AVKIN'S SIMULATIONS, MEET YOUR NEWEST PATIENT, JACOB.

KBPort's BPSim is a blood pressure cuff simulator. Used just like any other blood pressure cuff, the readings are controlled via a smartphone app. It can be programmed for any blood pressure range, including hypotension, normal, pre-hypertension, hypertension (stages 1 & 2), and hypertensive crisis.

BPSim

Getting accurate vital signs is critical when assessing a patient. With Innov2Learn's Thermometer and Oximeter devices, your learners will use real devices to capture and record simulated readings. No longer will you have to break fidelity to provide vital signs to your learners

Innov2Learn Pulse OX

Quality training is the most important element of working with live people in simulations. An untrained simulated participant (SP) can challenge the efficacy of your learning opportunities. A well-trained simulated participant (SP) can bring your simulations to life in ways you never thought possible. With all of this in mind, training an entire group of SPs can be time-consuming and feel intimidating.

Desktop

Innov2Learn's training devices function the same as any thermometer or oximeter you would find in a clinic. Your learners will take vital signs using real devices with readouts you control via Bluetooth. You can use a smartphone app or desktop computer.

Innov2Learn Thermometer

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9 KEYS TO HIGH FIDELITY SIMULATION WITH LIVE PEOPLE​

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STANDARDIZED PATIENT CHARACTER DESCRIPTION OUTLINE

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INTERVIEW QUESTIONS FOR STANDARDIZED PATIENT ONBOARDING

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STANDARDIZED PATIENT FEEDBACK TEMPLATE

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STANDARDIZED PATIENT SAMPLE JOB POSTING

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5 KEYS TO CONSIDER WHEN UTILIZING STANDARDIZED PATIENTS

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A SIMULATIONIST'S GUIDE TO HIGH FIDELITY SIMULATION